In The Media

Barbara Tricarico In the Media

Articles and Interviews

“Spectacular images of Crater Lake, Mount McLoughlin, the Klamath National Wildlife Refuge and other areas of the Klamath Basin are among those featured in two new photography books by Barbara Tricarico….In compiling [her] books, Tricarico puts out requests to regional photographers for images they are willing to provide. She said it takes six to eight months to gather and cull through often thousands of images, narrow them by region, create the layout and write captions before sending them to Pennsylvania-based Schiffler Publishing. “That’s the satisfaction for me,” she said. “Finding the right image.” She went all over Oregon to gather and photograph for her new “Oregon” book. Among the published photos are several she took at the Klamath National Wildlife Refuge and Crater Lake National Park. Both of the new books include a variety of stunning photos taken at Crater Lake from little seen vantages.”

“Ashland resident Barbara Tricarico has launched four new lavish, photo-rich books showcasing the natural and architectural beauty of Oregon, as well three purse-sized books on the Oregon Coast, Central Oregon and Southern Oregon….They’re all designed to tug at your heartstrings and twang memories of all you love about this state and may be starting to take for granted, says Tricarico, but that won’t ever happen….“You can sit with one of these books for hours and get lost in it,” said Tricarico. “You identify with them if you’re from here. Some give you a good feeling about what people are doing, some are good art photos, and some just really capture a place. You buy them for gifts. You send one to your sister because you want her to move here. I find them at wineries, B&Bs, my dentist’s office.””

“Do you want your photo to stand out, whether it’s for social media, a professional exhibit, or posterity? Here are just a few tips that will make your photos pop, whether you use a phone, a “point and shoot” or a serious camera. First, when shooting a group, hold your camera horizontally (not vertically). This especially holds true for shooting videos on your phone. For portraits, try a vertical orientation. If you have a newer phone with a “Portrait” feature, use it to blur the background. Those with more professional cameras will want to use a shallow depth of field (for “bokeh”). Then hold your camera steady so you won’t produce overall blurry photos. Ask your subjects to lean their torsos into the image (like a model might) and stand at an angle rather than straight on. If there is a nice background (think Crater Lake), put your subject off to the side so they’re not smack-dab center.”

“Barbara Tricarico is in the habit of creating stunning books that find a cozy nest on your coffee table. Her first one, called “Ashland, Oregon,” in 2014 was a beauty, depicting all the sights of the town — and now, just out, is her “Ashland Oregon Day Trips — a collection of awesome pics by 55 local photographers of natural and human-made attractions within three hours of Ashland. “It’s for Ashland people who think they’ve seen everything in the region, as well as for their guests who have seen a lot of Ashland but then wonder what’s around it in this beautiful area. There’s so much for them to visit.””

“From its striking cover of a glowing yellow maple tree and then across 160 pages, the coffee table book “Ashland, Oregon” is a visual treat for people interested in historic houses, seasonal foliage and landscaped grounds. The new book by Barbara Tricarico (Schiffer Publishing Ltd., $35) includes images by 33 photographers who captured exterior scenes of Southern Oregon’s city known for public theater and private property serving personal expression. Architectural diversity is one aspect of Ashland that intrigued photographer Tricarico, who co-authored and photographed “Quilts of Virginia: 1607-1899” while living in Northern Virginia. She moved to Ashland in 2010. “You can find a quaint home in the Railroad District adorned with colorful prayer flags while a few doors down there is an elegant 100-year old Victorian mansion or a stately Craftsman home,” she says. “Majestic old trees and white picket fences abound. The town is charming, cultural, creative and has a strong sense of community.””

“What can people hope to discover by reading your book? “I hope that people will discover that quilts were not only made for warmth, but for artistic beauty and as a creative outlet. Women also gathered in their sewing circles to share stories, mend broken hearts and comfort each other for the loss of a child or loved one. They still do that today. One of my favorite stories in the book is on page 100. Noted Virginians Jefferson Davis and Henry S. Foote actually fought a duel over their political differences. Yet their wives, along with the wife of Robert E. Lee, sat around a warm Virginia parlor and made a raffle quilt for charity together. Politics weren’t discussed. We do the same thing in today’s quilting bees. We are doctors, lawyers, pharmacists, housewives, men and women who share the love of quilting. It’s a way to remove the stress in our daily lives by stitching scraps of fabric together in friendship.”